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Spadgenske Dairy is a family-run business. Pictured are Mark and Kristine Spadgenske, center, with their son, Ryan, and Mark's twin brother, Mike. Marie Johnson / Forum News Service

The land of milk and money: Dairy farmers cope with chronically low milk prices, uncertain futures

DETROIT LAKES, Minn.—Phillip Rotz fears for his family's future in dairy farming.

His small 55-cow farm, Twin Oaks Dairy south of Detroit Lakes, has been around for about 45 years. Rotz and his brother took it over from their parents and now run it together. They're both married and have four children each, so the farm is supporting 14 people.

As Rotz said, "That's a lot of people to support with 55 cows."

Turning a profit has become a challenge for Twin Oaks Dairy in recent years, as chronically low milk prices cut into the business' bottom line. The Rotzes are in a situation that many U.S. dairy farmers are in right now: Their income from milk has decreased significantly, while operational costs around the farm have stayed the same or risen. It's getting harder and harder to make a living.

"When I started, everybody told me that there wasn't going to be a future — the big dairies were going to take over," Rotz said. "I didn't believe it and that's why I got into it. But now... I don't know what kind of a future there is for my kids as a small farm in the dairy industry."

Typically, milk prices swing up and down on three-year cycles, but 2018 is now the fourth year in a row of lower-than-average prices. With no signs of that changing any time soon, farming families in Becker County, as across the country, are having to make some tough choices.

Kristine Spadgenske, who is a board member on the Minnesota Dairy Promotion Council and is active in the Becker County Dairy Association, says she's heard a lot of talk about milk prices in recent years, and knows of a number of families who are struggling.

"We have farmers that are having very difficult conversations and are needing to make very difficult decisions," she said. "These are farmers that eat, live and breathe farming, and they're having to sit down at their tables and ask whether they can continue to live off these milk prices or continue to eat up equity — which you can only do for so long. Or, do you just make the decision that it's time to exit the business?"

Glass half empty

The slump in milk prices is caught up in a web of contributing factors. The modern dairy industry is a world market, affected by global supply and demand, imports and exports, and the exchange rate of the U.S. dollar. Since the European Union did away with its milk quotas in 2015, European countries have been producing more milk. When there's more milk to go around, the price farmers can fetch for it goes down.

A few years ago, U.S. farmers were making about $18 for every 100 pounds of milk they produced, which equates to about 11.6 gallons. Now, they're getting around $15.

"Our milk prices are very much affected by supply and demand in other countries," said Spadgenske.

Right now, dairy exports out of the U.S. are surging — one of the few pieces of positive news for dairy farmers. In May, Spadgenske said, the dairy industry "reached an all-time high in our exports, of 18.8 percent... One out of every seven tankers (full of milk) is going overseas."

Those national exports have a big impact on local dairy farms. The majority of milk produced in Becker County goes into cheese, Spadgenske said, which is an exportable product. Much of the rest remains fluid milk, which is also exportable.

"Everybody in the dairy industry is very much involved in that export market, and it very much affects our prices," she said.

U.S. milk prices have also been affected by a decline in fluid milk consumption. Spadgenske said people are still consuming dairy — in the form of yogurt, cheese and other milk-based products — but they're not drinking it by the glass the way they once did.

"All those things have had a sharp impact on our milk price," she said. "And it's definitely been some tough years."

Spadgenske and her husband, Mark, along with Mark's twin brother, run a 300-cow dairy operation about 20 miles east of Frazee. Since milk prices dropped, they've seen a one-third reduction in their income.

Spadgenske Dairy Farm uses a high-efficiency milking system, and has little debt, so the family's managing, Spadgenske said, "But I know that's not true of every farm. I know how difficult it is for them and their businesses and what they're going through."

At Twin Oaks Dairy, Rotz said the dairy operation is "hanging even" — not losing money, but not really making any, either. The family is scrimping where it can, putting off any non-essential purchases and buying their supplies by the pallet so they can get bigger volume discounts.

"It makes it tough to do anything extra, like upgrade machinery or anything like that," Rotz said.

Milk prices affect all farms, big or small, but Rotz believes smaller farms are at a greater financial disadvantage. Bigger producers benefit from bigger volume discounts on their supplies, he said, and co-ops offer discounts to the larger producers since they don't have to make as many stops to fill their trucks up with milk.

Smaller farms also face more hurdles with financing, as their tighter profit margins make it more difficult for them to qualify for bank loans, Rotz said. This puts expansion projects and major technology upgrades — which would allow the farm to grow—out of reach for small farmers, while larger farms just keep expanding.

"It's a system that's set up to help the big guy, and I don't know how to fix that," he said. "It's not exactly equal... The dairy business isn't that different from all small businesses — the family businesses seem to be disappearing, and the mega businesses are taking over."

There are few solutions for dairy farmers who are struggling. The dairy industry is "not a heavily subsidized industry," according to Spadgenske, and a USDA Farm Service Agency safety net program — which she describes as "almost like an insurance program for milk" — doesn't always result in enough of a return to make it worth a farmer's while to pay the premiums.

Adding to farmers' frustrations is the uncertainty of dairy's future. The forecast for milk prices isn't encouraging, and it remains to be seen what, if any, impact President Trump's trade measures will have on dairy exports.

Glass half full

Over the past decade, the number of dairy farms in Becker County has dropped — from 76 farms in 2008 to 67 today, according to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. In the year 2000, there were 140 farms in the county.

Yet as the number of dairy farms in Becker County has decreased, the number of dairy cows has increased, from 7,100 cows a decade ago to 7,800 today. There are fewer farms, but more cows, which is indicative of one of the major solutions dairy farmers have come up with to combat reduced profits from low milk prices — increased efficiency.

Robotic milking technologies allow farmers to beef up their herds without having to also beef up their labor costs. Many dairy farmers around Becker County are already using the technology, and others, including Rotz, are considering making the switch.

"We've visited other farms that were in the same situation we're in and they went to a modern double-robot barn and they're liking it," Rotz said. "They've doubled their herds and they've said they're spending about the same amount of time working it as before."

Upgrading the family's 100-year-old barn and installing all that new tech would be a huge investment, and Rotz said that even with a doubled herd he's not sure he could afford the loan payments. So for now, he's holding off. If or when the price of milk goes back up, Twin Oaks Dairy may be able to get those upgrades.

Until then, the family is managing, thanks to their crops of organic corn. The corn is bringing in enough revenue to make up for the family's lost dairy profits.

"That's helped a lot," says Rotz. "If it was conventional corn, that wouldn't help that much, because that price is low, too. But it's helped considerably that we've certified our corn organic."

Going organic is another creative solution that dairy farmers are coming up with to bolster their bottom lines while milk prices are low. They're also working off-farm jobs, switching to beef cattle, and adding new or additional crops.

"Many farms are looking at diversification...to supplement that income," said Spadgenske.

Most farmers are doing whatever they can to keep their farms going, as they have no desire to leave the business and, in some cases, like Rotz's, they're still holding out hope that their kids can have a successful future in dairy farming.

"It is truly who you are," Spadgenske said of being a dairy farmer. "It is in your blood. It is in your DNA."

Marie Johnson

Marie Johnson joined the Detroit Lakes Tribune as a reporter and magazine editor in November 2017 after several years of writing and editing at the Perham Focus. She lives in Detroit Lakes with her husband, Dan, their 3-year-old son and baby daughter, and their yellow Lab.

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